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What are Likert-Type Scale Responses, when to use them + lots of examples

What are Likert-Type Scale Responses

 

What is “Rating scale”

A “rating scale” is a set of answers designed with the aim of collecting information about a quantitative or a qualitative attribute. Some common examples of rating scales in social sciences, particularly psychology are the “likert-type scales” in which a person selects an statement among several statement or “1-10 rating scales” in which a person selects the number which is considered to reflect the perceived quality of the asked subject.

Additionally, in interactive environments such as the web, “Rating stars”, “Thumbs up and down” and “Sliders” can be considered as Rating scale types of questions. Such rating scales are used widely online in websites, blogs, websites and online surveys, in an attempt to provide indications of consumer or users opinions of products or services.

When you use the rating scale questions in your surveys, you require the raters (survey participants) to assign a value -which can be even numeric-, to the rated object, or to some attributes of it.

What is “Likert-type scale”

A Likert scale provides a great way of measuring attitudes, knowledge, perceptions, values, and behavioral changes. A Likert-type scale involves a series of statements that survey respondents may choose from, in order to rate their responses to evaluative questions.

When to Use Likert-type Scales

This type of question is very useful when you need an overall measurement of a particular topic, opinion or experience. When you use these questions, simultaneously you can collect data on contributing factors. It is very common to use likert-type scales when researchers want to evaluate the level of satisfaction for a recent shopping or visiting experience.

Tip:
Just like other types of rating questions — it’s recommended not to mix different scales within your surveys. Just pick a specific type of scale (3 point, 5 point, 7 point, etc) and use it as your standard to reduce potential confusion and fatigue. This will also make the comparison of your statistics easier!

Using our mobile-ready Likert Scale table

We have redesigned the Likert questions from scratch. They are not only mobile-friendly, but also allow you to add unlimited numbers of Likert Items. Feel free to try the question type out in your next online surveys. Read more about our Liker Scale table.

Modern Likert Scale question, designed for mobile surveys.

Here are some examples that show you how you can ask such questions in your online surveys:

Note:
For the following examples, numbers in the answers indicate the relative position of items, but not the magnitude of difference. You do not have to include them in your survey questions if you desire so.

Examples

Comparing 2 Products

1 – Much worse
2 – Somewhat worse
3 – About the same
4 – Somewhat better
5 – Much better

Quality

1 – Poor
2 – Fair
3 – Good
4 – Very good
5 – Excellent

Support / Opposition

1 – Strongly oppose
2 – Somewhat oppose
3 – Neutral
4 – Somewhat favour
5 – Strongly favour

Barriers

1 – Not a barrier
2 – Somewhat of a barrier
3 – Moderate barrier
4 – Extreme barrier

 

Likelihood

1 – Extremely unlikely
2 – Unlikely
3 – Neutral
4 – Likely
5 – Extremely likely

Good / Bad

1 – Very negative
2 – Negative
3 – Neutral
4 – Positive
5 – Very positive

Reflect Me

1 – Very untrue of me
2 – Untrue of me
3 – Somewhat untrue of me
4 – Neutral
5 – Somewhat true of me
6 – True of me
7 – Very true of me

My beliefs

1 – Very untrue of what I believe
2 – Untrue of what I believe
3 – Somewhat untrue of what I believe
4 – Neutral
5 – Somewhat true of what I believe
6 – True of what I believe
7 – Very true of what I believe

Level of Familiarity

1 – Not at all familiar
2 – Slightly familiar
3 – Somewhat familiar
4 – Moderately familiar
5 – Extremely familiar

Level of Awareness

1 – Not at all aware
2 – Slightly aware
3 – Somewhat aware
4 – Moderately aware
5 – Extremely aware

Knowledge of Action

1 – Never true
2 – Rarely true
3 – Sometimes but infrequently true
4 – Neutral
5 – Sometimes true
6 – Usually true
7 – Always true

Affect on …

1 – No affect
2 – Minor affect
3 – Neutral
4 – Moderate affect
5 – Major affect

Level of Acceptability

1 – Totally unacceptable
2 – Unacceptable
3 – Slightly unacceptable
4 – Neutral
5 – Slightly acceptable
6 – Acceptable
7 – Perfectly Acceptable

Level of Appropriateness

1 – Absolutely inappropriate
2 – Inappropriate
3 – Slightly inappropriate
4 – Neutral
5 – Slightly appropriate
6 – Appropriate
7 – Absolutely appropriate

Level of Importance

1 – Not at all important
2 – Low importance
3 – Slightly important
4 – Neutral
5 – Moderately important
6 – Very important
7 – Extremely important

Level of Concern

1 – Not at all concerned
2 – Slightly concerned
3 – Somewhat concerned
4 – Moderately concerned
5 – Extremely concerned

Level of Difficulty

1 – Very difficult
2 – Difficult
3 – Neutral
4 – Easy
5 – Very easy

Level of Influence

1 – Not at all influential
2 – Slightly influential
3 – Somewhat influential
4 – Moderately influential
5 – Extremely influential

Level of Responsibility

1 – Not at all responsible
2 – Somewhat responsible
3 – Mostly responsible
4 – Completely responsible

Level of Desirability

1 – Very undesirably
2 – Undesirable
3 – Neutral
4 – Desirable
5 – Very desirable

Level of Participation

1 – No, and not considered
2 – No, but considered
3 – Yes

Level of Consideration

1 – Would not consider
2 – Might or might not consider
3 – Definitely consider

Level of Probability

1 – Not probable
2 – Somewhat improbable
3 – Neutral
4 – Somewhat probable
5 – Very probable

Overall Impression

1 – Didn’t get what I wanted
2 – Got a little of what I wanted
3 – Somewhat got what I wanted
4 – Got a lot of what I wanted
5 – Got everything I wanted

Level of Agreement

1 – Strongly disagree
2 – Disagree
3 – Somewhat disagree
4 – Neither agree or disagree
5 – Somewhat agree
6 – Agree
7 – Strongly agree

Level of Agreement

1 – Strongly disagree
2 – Disagree
3 – Neither agree or disagree
4 – Agree
5 – Strongly agree

Level of Satisfaction

1 – Completely dissatisfied
2 – Mostly dissatisfied
3 – Somewhat dissatisfied
4 – Neither satisfied or dissatisfied
5 – Somewhat satisfied
6 – Mostly satisfied
7 – Completely satisfied

Level of Satisfaction

1 – Not at all satisfied
2 – Slightly satisfied
3 – Unsure
4 – Very satisfied
5 – Extremely satisfied

Frequency

1 – Never
2 – Rarely, in less than 10% of the chances when I could have
3 – Occasionally, in about 30% of the chances when I could have
4 – Sometimes, in about 50% of the chances when I could have
5 – Frequently, in about 70% of the chances when I could have
5 – Usually, in about 90% of the chances I could have
5 – Every time

Frequency

1 – Never
2 – Rarely
3 – Occasionally / Sometimes
4 – Often
5 – Always

Priority

1 – Not a priority
2 – Low priority
3 – Somewhat priority
4 – Neutral
5 – Moderate Priority
6 – High Priority
7 – Essential Priority

Priority

1 – Not a priority
2 – Low priority
3 – Neutral
4 – High Priority
5 – Essential Priority

 

More help Need to know more?

There are many professional things you need to know and consider, when using Likert Scale questions in your surveys. Have a look at the following guide, to read more about Likert Scale questions, and learn how to use and analyse their data.

Learn more about Likert Scale questions…
 

With SurveyLegend, you easily can make Likert Scale questions which are responsive and can beautifully adjust even to small screen of mobile phones. You can have literally unlimited number of response choices, and even add pictures to your Likert Scale questions. Have a look at our user guide, and learn more about all your legendary powers ; )

Learn to make Likert Scale questions…
 

Pouya Sinaian

Founder/CEO at PES.Nu
Mathematician, statistician data analyst, and lecturer. MSc in "Mathematical Modelling and Simulation" from BTH, Sweden.

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